GDN
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Region type:
Rural-Urban:
Properties:
Non-gas properties:
Fuel poverty:
Claimant count:
I.M. deprivation:
ECO eligible:

The
non-gas map

A detailed data-rich map of Great Britain showing properties off the gas grid

  • Click or hover to browse data
  • Click any icon to change shading
  • Zoom in to see LSOAs
  • Register/log-in to view postcodes
  • Search by postcode or LA/LSOA code
  • See the panel for full details and disclaimer
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The non-gas map: FAQ and data info

What is this map?

The non-gas map is a detailed map of Great Britain showing the distribution of properties without a gas grid connection across local authorities, LSOAs (lower-level super output areas) and, for registered users, postcodes. It also provided a wealth of other information about each properties and residents, from the type of house or flat to the type of heating and tenure.

Who created the map?

It was created by Kiln for Affordable Warmth Solutions, in conjunction with the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy.

Where is the data from

The data sources are as follows: Off-gas-grid properties, ECO and energy efficiency measures: BEIS. Tenure, central heating type, number of bedrooms (England/Wales) or rooms (Scotland): ONS (2011 census). Rural-urban designation: DEFRA, Scottish government. Indices of multiple deprivation: ONS, Welsh Government, Scottish Government. Claimant count: DWP, Scottish Government. See below for more details.

What can I search for?

The search box allows you to jump directly to an individual postcode. You can also enter the name or code of a local authority or LSOA.

How do I get access to the postcode view

The postcode view is available to registered users only. Registration is controlled by the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. You can apply to register or if you are already registered.

How do I switch between local authority, LSOA and postcode view?

The region type changes automatically as you zoom in (with postcodes showing or not depending on whether you are logged in). It is not possible to show more granular regions at a lower zoom level as they would be difficult to see and the amount of data required by the browser would be too great.

How do I change the shading?

You can shade the map by any metric with a paint brush icon next to it. Click the icon and the shading will change to show that metric as a proportion of the total number of residential properties. The shading scale updates automatically as you pan and zoom, recalibrating to maximise the spread of colours.

Data sources and information

Region Type

The region type is either a Local Authority or Lower Super Output Area (LSOA) classification.

LSOAs are derived from Output Areas, which are the basic building block of all census geographies. They were developed using address point location data taking into account the population and geographical size, topology (such as rivers, major roads, etc), urban/rural mix and internal social homogeneity. The differences in the development of OAs in Scotland and England/Wales result in two census geographies: Super Output Area geographies in England and Wales and Data Zone geographies in Scotland.

LSOAs were developed by merging 4 to 6 Output areas (OA). They were constrained by the mutual proximity of the OAs, population and household threshold and internal social homogeneity. Each LSOA contains approximately 1000 household residents, and they cover the whole of England and Wales. In total, there are around 34,753 LSOAs in England and Wales.

The Scottish equivalents of LSOAs are Data Zones (DZs). The main differences between LSOAs and DZs are the starting points used in determining the area (primary school areas in Scotland, unit postcodes in England and Wales) and measures of internal social homogeneity. Scottish DZ are also smaller than LSOAs, each DZ contains approximately 500 household residents. There are 6,505 DZs in Scotland.

The code for each LSOA/DZ is represented by the name of the Local Authority the LSOA/DZ is located within followed by a 4 digit code

Further information about LSOAs and Data Zones can be found on the ONS website

Rural/Urban Classification

The 2011 Rural-Urban Classification categorises LSOAs on the basis of physical settlement and related characteristics.

LSOAs are assigned to one of four urban or six rural categories:

  • Urban: Major Conurbation (A1)
  • Urban: Minor Conurbation (B1)
  • Urban: City and Town (C1)
  • Urban: City and Town in a Sparse Setting (C2)
  • Rural: Town and Fringe (D1)
  • Rural: Town and Fringe in a Sparse Setting (D2)
  • Rural: Village (E1)
  • Rural: Village in a Sparse Setting (E2)
  • Rural: Hamlets and Isolated Dwellings (F1)
  • Rural: Hamlets and Isolated Dwellings in a Sparse Setting (F2)

Further guidance on this classification can be found on the website for the Department for Environment and Rural Affairs

Properties

The total number of residential properties as recorded on the AddressBase Premium Product as at end of April 2015.

AddressBase Premium is the most current, comprehensive and accurate geographic dataset available of addresses, properties and land areas where services are provided. The number of properties are shown at both LSOA and Local Authority level.

Source: Ordnance Survey

Non-gas properties

BEIS have estimated the percentage of non-gas properties at LSOA level using AddressBase and the location details of properties on the gas grid during 2013.

These statistics are also shown at Local Authority level.

To ensure no individuals are identifiable from the map, the distances data will not be shown for LSOAs and Local Authorities which have less than 6 properties off the gas grid.

Distances from gas grid

BEIS has data on the location of the gas mains network (below 7 bar distribution network), provided by the gas network operators, and used this combined with location details of the non-gas grid properties to obtain an estimate of the distance of each ‘non-gas’ property from the gas mains network.

This data has subsequently been grouped by properties within 23 meters of the distribution network ; within 50 meters; within 500 meters; within 2km; and greater than 2km.

The figures shown on the map are cumulative totals for each distance band. For example, properties in the <23 meters band; will also be counted in the <50 meters band.

To ensure no individuals are identifiable from the map, the distances data will not be shown for LSOAs which have less than 6 properties off the gas grid.

Disclosure control

In order to preserve confidentiality a degree of random record swapping has been applied to the data.

Fuel poverty

The fuel poverty indicator shows the percentage of households within each Local Authority that are fuel poor.

These statistics are sourced from Table 2 of the 2013 sub-regional fuel poverty tables for England and Wales. Data is not available for Scotland.

Further information on the definition of fuel poverty indicator can be found online

Claimant count

Jobseeker’s Allowance, residence-based proportions as at March 2015 for England and Wales. The residence-based proportion expresses the number of claimants (people claiming Jobseeker's Allowance (JSA) and National Insurance credits at Jobcentre Plus local offices) in an area as a percentage of the population aged 16-64 in that area. The population figures to calculate the proportions are sourced from mid-year population estimates.

The data and further guidance can be found on the NOMIS website

The claimant count for Scotland can be found on the Scottish Neighbourhood Statistics website. The Identifier System ID for the table of interest is CS-JSA_pertot.

Note: for privacy reasons, claimant count data isn’t published when the value is 1 or 2. We have substituted 1.5 in these cases.

Index of Multiple Deprivation

The The English Index of Multiple Deprivation 2015 provides a relative measure of deprivation in small areas (LSOAs) across England.

The The English Index of Multiple Deprivation 2015 is based on the concept that deprivation consists of more than just poverty. Poverty is not having enough money to get by on whereas deprivation refers to a general lack of resources and opportunities.

The The English Indices of Deprivation is the collective name for a group of 7 indices which all measure different aspects of deprivation. The most widely used of these is the Index of Multiple Deprivation which is a combination of a number of the other indices to give an overall score for the relative level of multiple deprivation experienced in every neighbourhood in England.

Further guidance on the Indices can be found on the Department for Communities and Local Government website.

The Indices of Multiple Deprivation 2014 for Wales and further guidance on can be found on the Welsh Government website

The Indices of Multiple Deprivation 2012 for Scotland and further guidance on can be found on the Scottish Government website

Note: Ranks for each country are not comparable. Further information on the issue of comparing IMDs across the UK can be found on the Neighbourhood Statistics website.

ECO eligible

This data identifies LSOAs in the UK that are eligible for Carbon Saving Community Obligation (CSCO) support. Further information on this can be found here

Penetration of Energy Efficiency Measures

Table 1.11a showing the number of ECO measures by ECO obligation at Local Authority level up to the end of December 2014. Data at LSOA level is not available.

Census 2011 data

Central heating type

Table QS415EW on the NOMIS website provides 2011 estimates that classify occupied household spaces in England and Wales by the types of central heating present. The estimates are as at census day, 27 March 2011.

This dataset is available at LSOA and LA level and classifies households by the following categories:

  • All categories: Type of central heating in household
  • No central heating
  • Gas central heating – this isn’t on the map
  • Electric (including storage heaters) central heating
  • Oil central heating
  • Solid fuel (for example wood, coal) central heating
  • Other central heating
  • Two or more types of central heating

This table can be found on the NOMIS website. Please note that the type of central heating can only be provided for households that are occupied with at least one usual resident.

The equivalent table (QS415SC) for Scotland can be found on the Scotland Census website

Property type

Table QS402EW on the NOMIS website provides 2011 estimates that classify households in England and Wales by accommodation type. The estimates are as at census day, 27 March 2011.

This dataset is available at LSOA and LA level and classifies households by the following categories:

  • House: Detached
  • House: Semi-detached
  • House: Terraced (including end-terrace)
  • Flat: Purpose-built block of flats or tenement
  • Flat: Part of a converted or shared house (including bed-sits)
  • Flat: In commercial building
  • Caravan or other mobile or temporary structure
  • Shared dwelling

This table can be found on the NOMIS website

The equivalent table (QS402SC) for Scotland can be found on the Scotland Census website

Tenure

Table QS405EW on the NOMIS website provides 2011 estimates that classify households in England and Wales by tenure. The estimates are as at census day, 27 March 2011.

This dataset is available at LSOA and LA level and classifies households by the following categories:

  • Owned outright
  • Owned with a mortgage or loan
  • Shared ownership (part owned and part rented)
  • Rented from council (Local Authority)
  • Other social rented
  • Private landlord or letting agency
  • Employer of a household member
  • Relative or friend of household member
  • Other
  • Living rent free

In the map, ‘rented other’ covers ‘employers of a household member’, ‘relative or friend of household member’ and ‘other’.

This table can be found on the NOMIS website.

The equivalent table (QS405SC) for Scotland can be found on the Scotland Census website

Number of bedrooms

Table LC1402EW on the NOMIS website provides 2011 Census estimates that classify households in England and Wales by household composition and by number of bedrooms. The estimates are as at census day, 27 March 2011.

This dataset is available at LSOA and LA level and classifies households by the following categories:

  • 1 bedroom
  • 2 bedrooms
  • 3 bedrooms
  • 4 bedrooms
  • 5 or more bedrooms

This table can be found on the NOMIS website

The Scottish Census 2011 does not cover the number of bedrooms, therefore, the number of rooms in a household have been used instead. This table (QS407SC) can be found on the Scotland Census website.

This dataset is available at Data Zone level and classifies households by the following categories:

  • 1 room
  • 2 rooms
  • 3 rooms
  • 4 rooms
  • 5 rooms
  • 6 rooms
  • 7 rooms
  • 8 rooms
  • 9 or more rooms